18.6 C
Los Angeles
Friday, June 21, 2024

The Most Glorious Gardens In Australia!

Garden stories are some of our most popular reads on TDF these days – take a look at the news cycle in the last 18 months and it’s not hard to work out why! There’s nothing more calming than bathing in the beauty of a glorious planting scheme, and landscape designers are the ones responsible for that instant tranquility.

They are the craftspeople taming the space between the domestic and wild, and it’s about time they got some recognition! From industry legends to newcomers, these are the 12 outstanding projects shortlisted in the Landscape Design category of the TDF + Laminex Design Awards 2021.

This category is proudly sponsored by Eco Outdoor.

5 Tips to Save on Bills

5 Tips to Save on BillsFinding ways to curb your monthly spending may leave you feeling like you’re living to work, not the other way around. When you’ve trimmed the excess from your monthly budget an

Avalon Beach And Surrounds With Virgine Batterson – The Design Files | Australia's most popular design blog.

While a beachside picnic may only now be a distant summer dream for us rugged-up Melburnians, it’s very much an all-year-round reality if you trip up North.

Take yourself on a virtual holiday (or plan a real one) with this guide for a relaxing family getaway to Avalon Beach, one hour north of Sydney’s city centre. French-born, Avalon-based fashion designer and retailer Virgine Batterson of  Mamapapa is your guide!

A Tasmanian Glass House Designed To Inspire

creative-peoplearchitectureA Tasmanian Glass House Designed To Inspire

If you could imagine the dream retreat – somewhere to fully escape from the everyday – it would likely look something like Glass House.

Designed by Room 11 Architects, the project is the client’s own private retreat, accompanying their main house located less than 200 metres away.

The vision for the building was simple: to place the residents directly in the landscape, immersed in those spectacular views across the Tasman Peninsula. Its design references great architectural glass houses throughout history (such as Philip Johnson’s 1949 Glass House), while adopting what Room 11’s director Thomas Bailey describes as a ‘Tasmanian vernacular interpretation of the typology.’

Most crucial to the project’s success was its siting, which Thomas says needed to be perfect. ‘Getting the floor height correct was absolutely critical for the experience…The subtle cantilever from the natural ground needed to express the projection into landscape that the Glass House experience is about,’ he says. 

Collaborating with the project engineer, the steel structure was kept deliberately lean, leaving the building as two horizontal ‘floating’ planes. ‘The idea was for the structure to recede, and to let the landscape be the experience of the house,’ says Thomas. 

The only ‘room’ within the house is the bathroom, which is concealed within a central timber pod. 

The beauty of this house lies in its directness and simplicity, enabling the owner to return to the simple pleasures of consciousness. Thomas says, ‘One of the true delights of the house is waking with the sunlight streaming on to the bed, and greeting the extraordinary landscape as the world awakens.’ 

There are no curtains or blinds in this project, just interrupted views through wall-to-ceiling glass of the Tasman Peninsula landscape. Photo – Adam Gibson


The project is the client’s own private retreat accompanying their main house located less than 200 metres away. Photo – Adam Gibson


The vision for the building was simple: to place the client between two planes, and open up to an experience of the Tasman Peninsula site. Photo – Adam Gibson


The design references great architectural glass houses throughout history such as Philip Johnson’s 1949 Glass House. Photo – Adam Gibson


The only ‘room’ within the house is the bathroom, which is concealed within a central timber pod. Photo – Adam Gibson


In collaboration with the project engineer, the steel structure was kept deliberately lean, leaving the building as two horizontal ‘floating’ planes. Photo – Adam Gibson


‘The idea was for the structure to recede, and to let the landscape be the experience of the house,’ says architect Thomas Bailey, the director of Room 11 Architects. Photo – Adam Gibson


THOSE views! Photo – Adam Gibson


The dream retreat! Photo – Adam Gibson


It basically glows at night. Photo – Adam Gibson

Check out our other content

Check out other tags:

Most Popular Articles