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Friday, June 21, 2024

A Designer’s Richly Layered Rental Property!

The power of decoration is on full display in the gorgeous rented Melbourne home of Sarah Shinners, design manager at Simone Haag (you might recognise her from our Dream Job column!), and prosthetist Patrick Shinners. 

When the couple moved into the Clifton Hill property in 2013, the interiors were covered in the one shade of beige. Fortunately, thanks to their flexible landlord, Sarah and Patrick were able to cosmetically transform the property, introducing new paint colours and curtains along the way.

Their home today is a warm, welcoming and layered space, dotted with art and objects created and collected over many years. Just goes to show – you don’t need to own your home, to make it your own!

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Dark Chocolate and Hazelnut Cake – The Design Files | Australia's most popular design blog.

Well, a month of Chocolate-themed recipes just wouldn’t be complete without a classic chocolate cake, would it? Today our resident chocolate maker, Jade Bentley of Monsieur Truffe shares with us her rich, fudgy and not-too-sweet chocolate cake.  This one is EPIC.  I would know, I tasted it… and the rest of it ended up in my ‘fridge for a week after this shoot.  Let’s just say… that was a great week!  – Lucy

A Refined Country Home That Celebrates The Seasons

creative-peoplearchitectureA Refined Country Home That Celebrates The Seasons

The attention to detail of Edition Office is on full display in Kyneton House, which demonstrates the possibilities of a simple floor plan, and restrained material palette.

Working with a strict budget, the architects designed a relatively modest brick house for the downsizing owners. The clients hoped the home would capture passing time, and the qualities of changing seasons including light, colour, and texture. 

A clear geometry was adopted for the floor plan, allowing continuous links to the garden, including the ability to read the full length and width of the site from within. 

Throughout the home are a series of repeated and rotated brick wall gestures. Always returning inwards, this repeating motif informs the ‘thickness’ of the home’s exterior. 

In contrast, crisp white ceilings including a skylight shaft pick up fluctuating levels of natural light, providing the home with a sense of softness. 

Materials intended to naturally weather such as recycled and texturally finished brick walls, pale concrete floors, and galvanised steel roofing further reflect the changing effects of weather and time. 

Also important is the home’s position set back from the street, allowing the large garden (including trees relocated from the owners’ previous property) to be the interface between the house and the street.

‘Crucially, this siting gesture allowed us to avoid the inclusion of a front fence, and allow the landscape to be encountered as a part of the public domain,’ says Edition Office director, Kim Bridgland.

Given the home’s modest footprint, orientation and thermal mass, no mechanical cooling is required. An air-exchange heat pump warms the floor slab when required in the cooler months.

What Kim loves most about the project is its sensibility, particularly the sense of calm and balance one feels when passing the outer threshold and entering the home. He says, ‘Time appears to stand still, while the subtle changes in light and mood in the surrounding gardens appear to play out in every direction as they wrap and embrace the home.’

Kyneton House by Edition Office. Artwork ‘Shake Down’ by Matt Arbuckle, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


The house’s position set well back from the street allows the large garden (including trees relocated from the owners’ previous property) to be the interface between the house and the street. Artwork ‘The Kingdom’ by Grant Nimmo, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Working with a strict budget, the architects designed a relatively modest brick house for the downsizing owners. Artwork ‘The Kingdom’ by Grant Nimmo, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Materials intended to naturally weather such as recycled and texturally finished brick walls, pale concrete floors, and galvanised steel roofing further reflect the changing effects of weather and time. Photo – Ben Hosking


The clients hoped the home would capture passing time and the qualities of changing seasons including light, colour, and texture. Artwork ‘The Kingdom’ by Grant Nimmo, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Artwork ‘She will be revealed tonight’ by Kirsty Budge, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Artwork ‘She will be revealed tonight’ by Kirsty Budge, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


A clear geometry was adopted for the floor plan allowing continuous links to the garden, including the ability to read the full length and width of the site from within. Artwork ‘She will be revealed tonight’ by Kirsty Budge, care of Daine Singer Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Given the house’s modest footprint, orientation and thermal mass, no mechanical cooling is required. Photo – Ben Hosking


An air-exchange heat pump warms the floor slab when required in the cooler months. Photo – Ben Hosking


Artwork ‘Votive’ by Adam Lee, care of Station Gallery. Photo – Ben Hosking


Throughout the home are a series of repeated and rotated brick wall gestures. Always returning inwards, this repeating motif informs the ‘thickness’ of the home’s exterior. Photo – Ben Hosking


What the architects love most about the project is its sensibility, particularly the sense of calm and balance one feels when passing the outer threshold and entering the home. Photo – Ben Hosking

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