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Thursday, May 30, 2024

An Old School Campground Transformed Into A Beachside Paradise

Five years ago, when on a holiday to her hometown of Esperance, Western Australia, Fiona Shillington took a wrong turn and stumbled upon a 30-year-old holiday camp that had fallen into disrepair. While most people would simply do a U-turn and be on their way, this moment of fate inspired a major change in lifestyle for Fiona and her family.

Fiona ended up purchasing the camp, and turning it into a unique holiday spot, characterised by its distinctive A-frame cabins. With a lot of hard work, Esperance Chalet Village is now one of the most sought-after accomodation offerings in Esperance!

An Open Chat On Foster Caring + IVF With Millie & Jessi Poutama

Millie and Jessi Poutama are LGBTQIA+ advocates raising their child in an off-grid community. 

When the couple decided to start a family, they began fostering a child, before pursuing their own fertility journey three years ago. Their newborn, Tide, was conceived with a known donor and the services of Rainbow Fertility – a dedicated fertility and IVF provider catering exclusively for the LGBTI+ community in Australia. 

We spoke to the inspiring pair about their experience as foster carers, the IVF process, their expectations of motherhood, and connecting Tide with their donor’s Māori heritage.

Emily Green's Joyous Family Home Filled With Local Makers’ Work

Emily Green’s home is just like her signature beaded jewellery – colourful, fun, and full of joy!

The designer and co-owner of Pinky’s gift store in Preston lives here with her husband, high school teacher Louis Turner; daughter Lotte (6); and son Jens (3).

Emily and Louis moved into the 1930s weatherboard house in Reservoir (12 kilometres north of Melbourne’s CBD) just before Lotte was born, and it’s become a true family home, full of love and (natural) light!

Carving Softness From Stone With Carol Crawford

familycreative-peopleCarving Softness From Stone With Carol Crawford

‘I consider myself a late career artist,’ says Carol Crawford. This mature blooming hasn’t held Carol’s practice back at all. In fact, it’s ensured her style is confident and fluid – the perfect fusion of inspiration and intuition.

‘I always try to preserve the characters of the raw stone, as this is its innate personality,’ says Carol. ‘I do not try to inflict my opinion on it – rather, it is a soft and slow conversation, back and forth, until we are both happy with the finished form.’

Carol came to sculpting in the early 2000s, after she had children and after she had studied art history at university. The moment came to settle on stone sculpture when she enrolled in classes at renowned artist Tom Bass’s Erskenville atelier. More than a decade and a half after those initial lessons, she is the chair of the Tom Bass Sculpture Studio School, which now runs as a not-for-profit.

Working with solid, intractable materials such as alabaster, bronze, soapstone, marble and plaster, Carol creates spherical, feminine bodies. ‘Sharp edges and hard lines are abhorrent to me, as is measuring and exactness,’ she says. ‘Nothing is geometric about my sculptures. They are flowering and imperfect.’

To achieve her organic sculptural forms, Carol works patiently with her hand tools. Firstly, she wields a pneumatic hammer for the primary stages of chipping (which makes up 5% of the overall work), before moving on to hand files and rasps to slowly unearth her curved forms within the stone. That is the magic of her skill, that these opaque, elemental substances seem soft and fleshy by the end.

Working with hand tools and a close ear to the essence of the work, the sculptures can take anywhere between a week and four or five months to finish.

‘I only know a sculpture is complete when my stomach feels settled – it’s quite a visceral feeling,’ she describes. ‘My output is very low, that is why each and every sculpture is very important and personal to me.’

And who better to capture Carol’s pursuits than her daughter, photographer Becca Crawford, who took these incredible images? What a talented family!

See more of Carol’s work here.

A prehistoric slab waiting to be coaxed into its innate, refined form by Carol. Photo – Becca Crawford.


Carol works with hand tools to find the final shape of a piece; the first being a pneumatic hammer which she uses in the initial chipping stages. Photo – Becca Crawford.


Each sculpture can take anywhere between two weeks and five months to complete. Photo – Becca Crawford.


Carol works with alabaster, marble, bronze, stone and plaster. Photo – Becca Crawford.


The alabaster takes on a glowing, translucent quality. Photo – Becca Crawford.


‘I always try to preserve the characters of the raw stone as this is its innate personality,’ says Carol. ‘I do not try to inflict my opinion on it – rather, it is a soft and slow conversation, back and forth, until we are both happy with the finished form.’ Photo – Becca Crawford.


One of Carol’s twisted, spherical sculptures impossibly balanced on its tip. Photo – Becca Crawford.


‘I only know a sculpture is complete when my stomach feels settled – it’s quite a visceral feeling,’ says Carol. Photo – Becca Crawford.

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